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(1486-1535)
 
Henry Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim
He was Born on the 14th of September, 1486,
at Cologne;
died at Grenoble or Lyons in 1534 or 1535.
Certainly one of the remarkable men of the
Renaissance period. 
Among his numerous accomplishments were that of
a "knight, doctor, and by common reputation,
a successful magickian".
Agrippa earned and repaid the bitter enmity of his more conservative colleauges.
He enrolled as a student in Cologne and Paris (1506),
in Spain (1507-08),
a teacher of Hebrew at D"le (1509),
a teacher in England (1510),
about which time he finished his infamous work
"De occulta philosophiā (Antwerp, 1531),
a mixture of Neoplatanism and the Kabbalah.
He spent some time in Italy in the military service of the Emperor Maximilian,
who rewarded his bravery by naming him a Ritter or knight.
He soon turned however, to other pursuits,
studied medicine, Hebrew, alchemy, theology,
and finally devoted himself to "Kabbalism"
 He resided and instructed in various places,
making friends or enemies wherever he went,
but was apparently not very successful financially,
as he was banished from Cologne for debt,
and spent his last days in poverty,
a typical example of the irregular,
rebellious life led by his type at that time.
His numerous works, chiefly philosophical,
have a strong bias toward "occultism",
and run counter to the received opinions of his time in theology and scholastic philosophy.
He lived and died nominally a Catholic,
but was openly in sympathy with some opposers 
of the religion, 
whose tone towards the Church and institutions he adopted while professing that he was merely attacking abuses,
not the Church, an attitude frequently assumed at that period.
His famous work "De incertitudine et vanitate scientiarum", published in 1527,
has been translated into many European vernaculars and is well described as a "compound of erudition and ignorance, gravity and vanity".
It abounds in denuonciations of scholasticism, the veneration of relics and saints, the canon law and the hierarchy, and calls for a return to the Scriptures as the philosopher's stone (Lydius lapis) of xian teaching.
For the rest he was no follower of xianity or nor were his closest companions. They interest him as the first who stood out with success against Catholic orthodoxy. Giordano Bruno made use of his writings,
and their influence was long powerful.
Among his minor writings are the often quoted booklet
"De nobilitate et pręcellentia feminei sexus declamatio", dedicated to Margaret of Austria,
"Libellus de sacramento matrimonii",
a commentary on the "Ars Brevrs", of Raymond Lully, etc.
A complete edition of his works appeared at Lyons in 1600.
Stöckl, in Kirchenlex., I, 364-366; Morley, Life of Cornelius Agrippa (London, 1856).
 Agrippa relied heavily on Talismanic magick.
Some of these can be found reprinted in the book by
Francis Barret,
'The Magus'.

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(1486-1535)
 
Henry Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim
He was Born on the 14th of September, 1486,
at Cologne;
died at Grenoble or Lyons in 1534 or 1535.
Certainly one of the remarkable men of the
Renaissance period. 
Among his numerous accomplishments were that of
a "knight, doctor, and by common reputation,
a successful magickian".
Agrippa earned and repaid the bitter enmity of his more conservative colleauges.
He enrolled as a student in Cologne and Paris (1506),
in Spain (1507-08),
a teacher of Hebrew at D"le (1509),
a teacher in England (1510),
about which time he finished his infamous work
"De occulta philosophiā (Antwerp, 1531),
a mixture of Neoplatanism and the Kabbalah.
He spent some time in Italy in the military service of the Emperor Maximilian,
who rewarded his bravery by naming him a Ritter or knight.
He soon turned however, to other pursuits,
studied medicine, Hebrew, alchemy, theology,
and finally devoted himself to "Kabbalism"
 He resided and instructed in various places,
making friends or enemies wherever he went,
but was apparently not very successful financially,
as he was banished from Cologne for debt,
and spent his last days in poverty,
a typical example of the irregular,
rebellious life led by his type at that time.
His numerous works, chiefly philosophical,
have a strong bias toward "occultism",
and run counter to the received opinions of his time in theology and scholastic philosophy.
He lived and died nominally a Catholic,
but was openly in sympathy with some opposers 
of the religion, 
whose tone towards the Church and institutions he adopted while professing that he was merely attacking abuses,
not the Church, an attitude frequently assumed at that period.
His famous work "De incertitudine et vanitate scientiarum", published in 1527,
has been translated into many European vernaculars and is well described as a "compound of erudition and ignorance, gravity and vanity".
It abounds in denuonciations of scholasticism, the veneration of relics and saints, the canon law and the hierarchy, and calls for a return to the Scriptures as the philosopher's stone (Lydius lapis) of xian teaching.
For the rest he was no follower of xianity or nor were his closest companions. They interest him as the first who stood out with success against Catholic orthodoxy. Giordano Bruno made use of his writings,
and their influence was long powerful.
Among his minor writings are the often quoted booklet
"De nobilitate et pręcellentia feminei sexus declamatio", dedicated to Margaret of Austria,
"Libellus de sacramento matrimonii",
a commentary on the "Ars Brevrs", of Raymond Lully, etc.
A complete edition of his works appeared at Lyons in 1600.
Stöckl, in Kirchenlex., I, 364-366; Morley, Life of Cornelius Agrippa (London, 1856).
 Agrippa relied heavily on Talismanic magick.
Some of these can be found reprinted in the book by
Francis Barret,
'The Magus'.

Insert

(1486-1535)
 
Henry Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim
He was Born on the 14th of September, 1486,
at Cologne;
died at Grenoble or Lyons in 1534 or 1535.
Certainly one of the remarkable men of the
Renaissance period. 
Among his numerous accomplishments were that of
a "knight, doctor, and by common reputation,
a successful magickian".
Agrippa earned and repaid the bitter enmity of his more conservative colleauges.
He enrolled as a student in Cologne and Paris (1506),
in Spain (1507-08),
a teacher of Hebrew at D"le (1509),
a teacher in England (1510),
about which time he finished his infamous work
"De occulta philosophiā (Antwerp, 1531),
a mixture of Neoplatanism and the Kabbalah.
He spent some time in Italy in the military service of the Emperor Maximilian,
who rewarded his bravery by naming him a Ritter or knight.
He soon turned however, to other pursuits,
studied medicine, Hebrew, alchemy, theology,
and finally devoted himself to "Kabbalism"
 He resided and instructed in various places,
making friends or enemies wherever he went,
but was apparently not very successful financially,
as he was banished from Cologne for debt,
and spent his last days in poverty,
a typical example of the irregular,
rebellious life led by his type at that time.
His numerous works, chiefly philosophical,
have a strong bias toward "occultism",
and run counter to the received opinions of his time in theology and scholastic philosophy.
He lived and died nominally a Catholic,
but was openly in sympathy with some opposers 
of the religion, 
whose tone towards the Church and institutions he adopted while professing that he was merely attacking abuses,
not the Church, an attitude frequently assumed at that period.
His famous work "De incertitudine et vanitate scientiarum", published in 1527,
has been translated into many European vernaculars and is well described as a "compound of erudition and ignorance, gravity and vanity".
It abounds in denuonciations of scholasticism, the veneration of relics and saints, the canon law and the hierarchy, and calls for a return to the Scriptures as the philosopher's stone (Lydius lapis) of xian teaching.
For the rest he was no follower of xianity or nor were his closest companions. They interest him as the first who stood out with success against Catholic orthodoxy. Giordano Bruno made use of his writings,
and their influence was long powerful.
Among his minor writings are the often quoted booklet
"De nobilitate et pręcellentia feminei sexus declamatio", dedicated to Margaret of Austria,
"Libellus de sacramento matrimonii",
a commentary on the "Ars Brevrs", of Raymond Lully, etc.
A complete edition of his works appeared at Lyons in 1600.
Stöckl, in Kirchenlex., I, 364-366; Morley, Life of Cornelius Agrippa (London, 1856).
 Agrippa relied heavily on Talismanic magick.
Some of these can be found reprinted in the book by
Francis Barret,
'The Magus'.

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                                   (1486-1535)
 
Henry Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim
He was Born on the 14th of September, 1486,
at Cologne;
died at Grenoble or Lyons in 1534 or 1535.
Certainly one of the remarkable men of the
Renaissance period. 
Among his numerous accomplishments were that of
a "knight, doctor, and by common reputation,
a successful magickian".
Agrippa earned and repaid the bitter enmity of his more conservative colleauges.
He enrolled as a student in Cologne and Paris (1506),
in Spain (1507-08),
a teacher of Hebrew at D"le (1509),
a teacher in England (1510),
about which time he finished his infamous work
"De occulta philosophiā (Antwerp, 1531),
a mixture of Neoplatanism and the Kabbalah.
He spent some time in Italy in the military service of the Emperor Maximilian,
who rewarded his bravery by naming him a Ritter or knight.
He soon turned however, to other pursuits,
studied medicine, Hebrew, alchemy, theology,
and finally devoted himself to "Kabbalism"
 He resided and instructed in various places,
making friends or enemies wherever he went,
but was apparently not very successful financially,
as he was banished from Cologne for debt,
and spent his last days in poverty,
a typical example of the irregular,
rebellious life led by his type at that time.
His numerous works, chiefly philosophical,
have a strong bias toward "occultism",
and run counter to the received opinions of his time in theology and scholastic philosophy.
He lived and died nominally a Catholic,
but was openly in sympathy with some opposers 
of the religion, 
whose tone towards the Church and institutions he adopted while professing that he was merely attacking abuses,
not the Church, an attitude frequently assumed at that period.
His famous work "De incertitudine et vanitate scientiarum", published in 1527,
has been translated into many European vernaculars and is well described as a "compound of erudition and ignorance, gravity and vanity".
It abounds in denuonciations of scholasticism, the veneration of relics and saints, the canon law and the hierarchy, and calls for a return to the Scriptures as the philosopher's stone (Lydius lapis) of xian teaching.
For the rest he was no follower of xianity or nor were his closest companions. They interest him as the first who stood out with success against Catholic orthodoxy. Giordano Bruno made use of his writings,
and their influence was long powerful.
Among his minor writings are the often quoted booklet
"De nobilitate et pręcellentia feminei sexus declamatio", dedicated to Margaret of Austria,
"Libellus de sacramento matrimonii",
a commentary on the "Ars Brevrs", of Raymond Lully, etc.
A complete edition of his works appeared at Lyons in 1600.
Stöckl, in Kirchenlex., I, 364-366; Morley, Life of Cornelius Agrippa (London, 1856).
 Agrippa relied heavily on Talismanic magick.
Some of these can be found reprinted in the book by
Francis Barret,
'The Magus'.

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